Plenary Speakers

W.E. Moerner

W.E. Moerner

Professor, Chemistry and, by courtesy, Applied Physics
Stanford University, CA

W. E. (William Esco) Moerner conducts research in physical chemistry and chemical physics of single molecules, single-molecule biophysics, super-resolution imaging and tracking in cells, and trapping of single molecules in solution. His interests span methods of precise quantitation of single-molecule properties, to strategies for three-dimensional imaging and tracking of single molecules, to applications of single-molecule measurements to understand biological processes in cells, to observations of the photodynamics of single photosynthetic proteins and enzymes. He has been elected Fellow/Member of the NAS, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, AAAS, ACS, APS, and OSA. Major awards include the Earle K. Plyler Prize for Molecular Spectroscopy, the Irving Langmuir Prize in Chemical Physics, the Pittsburgh Spectroscopy Award, the Peter Debye Award in Physical Chemistry, the Wolf Prize in Chemistry, and the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

Joseph DeRisi

Joseph DeRisi

Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator
Professor & Chair, Biochemistry and Biophysics, UC San Francisco

Joseph DeRisi employs an interdisciplinary approach, combining genomics, bioinformatics, biochemistry, and bioengineering to study parasitic and viral infectious diseases in a wide range of organisms. One of the early pioneers of DNA microarray technology and whole genome expression profiling, DeRisi has national recognition for his efforts to make this technology accessible and freely available. Today, he uses this approach to study the activity of the full range of malaria genes and has generated provocative insights in many emerging viral diseases. In 2004, he was chosen for a MacArthur Fellowship. In addition to being a Searle Scholar and a Packard Fellow, he has received the Heinz Award in Technology, the Economy, and Employment, and was named an Eli Lilly and Company Research Award Laureate. He received a B.A. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (1992) from UC Santa Cruz, and a Ph.D. in Biochemistry (1999) from Stanford University.

Jennifer Cochran

Jennifer Cochran

Hitachi America Faculty Scholar Associate Professor of Bioengineering and (by courtesy) Chemical Engineering, Director of Graduate Studies in Bioengineering, Stanford University

Jennifer Cochran has over 14 years of experience in protein- and peptide-based drug discovery and development for applications in regenerative medicine, ocular disease, and cancer imaging and therapy. Several of these designer proteins are at various stages of commercialization and clinical translation. She obtained her Ph.D. in Biological Chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she also completed a postdoctoral fellowship in Biological Engineering. She has received the National Cancer Institute Howard Temin Award, the Martin D. Abeloff Scholar Award from the V Foundation for Cancer Research, an American Cancer Society Research Scholar Award, and a Sidney Kimmel Scholar Award. She was also named the 47th Mallinckrodt Faculty Scholar from the Edward Mallinckrodt Jr. Foundation.

David Haussler

David Haussler

Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator 
Distinguished Professor, Biomolecular Engineering, UC Santa Cruz
Scientific Director, UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute

David Haussler's UC Santa Cruz research team assembled and posted the first working draft of the genome on the Internet on July 7, 2000, thereby ensuring the human genome would exist forever in the public domain. In the past decade, research based on the genome has increased exponentially, due in large part to the UCSC Genome Browser. Their deep experience in data visualization and analysis makes the database not just a storehouse of information, but a dynamic tool and gateway for scientific discovery. In 2012 the National Cancer Institute selected UCSC to house the data for its genomic programs. The resulting UC Santa Cruz Cancer Genomics Hub is the first Trusted Partner of the NIH for distributing patient genomics data that require restricted access due to privacy concerns. Oncologists and researchers quickly seized on the hub to identify commonalities in cancers, visualize data, and test theories. Haussler co-founded and co-chairs the Data Working Group of the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health, through which research, health care, and disease advocacy organizations that have taken the first steps to standardize and enable secure sharing of genomic and clinical data. He shares the 2015 Dan David Prize.

Robert Coffman

Robert Coffman

Senior Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer
Dynavax Corporation, Berkeley, CA
 

Before joining Dynavax in 2000, Robert L. Coffman was a founding member of the DNAX Research Institute in Palo Alto, CA. He has authored more than 200 scientific publications, is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Microbiology, and has received a number of prestigious awards for his work. With colleague Tim Mosmann, he defined the two principal subtypes of helper T cells, termed Th1 and Th2 cells, and demonstrated the central relationship between their differences in cytokine expression and function. He defined basic mechanisms of T-cell regulation in asthma and infectious and parasitic diseases and demonstrated the central role of regulatory CD4+ T cells in preventing inflammatory bowel disease. At Dynavax, Coffman has pioneered the development of agonists and antagonists for Toll-like receptors, which are key recognition receptors in innate immunity.

Luke Lee

Luke Lee

Arnold and Barbara Silverman Distinguished Professor
Co-director, Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center

Luke Lee received both his BA and PhD from UC Berkeley. He joined the UC Berkeley faculty in 1999 and then became the Lester John and Lynne Dewar Lloyd distinguished professor of bioengineering in 2005. Lee also served as the chair professor in systems nanobiology at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH, Z├╝rich) from 2006 to 2007. His work at the interface of biological, physical, and engineering sciences for medicine has been recognized by many honors that include the IEEE William J. Morlock Award, NSF Career Award, Fulbright Scholar Award, and the HoAm Prize. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry and the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE). His current research interests are nanoscale biophotonics in living cells, molecular diagnostics of infectious and neurodegenerative diseases, bioinspired neural interfaces and organs on a chip, and in vitro neurogenesis focusing on fundamental quantum nanobiology and on solving ill-defined problems of healthcare.

Sponsors

 



Bioengineering Institute of California




 

 

Nature Methods